Salary Isn’t Everything in Successful Recruitment Strategies

Developing recruitment strategies doesn’t necessarily mean that you need to promise high salaries and make other promises you can’t keep. In fact, rather than focusing on compensation, it might benefit you more to turn your attention to the aspects of the job that make people want to come to work. For instance, ask yourself if employees are engaged in the work they’re doing. Are people typically happy to be there? Frustrated? Think on these elements of the position before you attempt to cast out any lures. According to Entrepreneur, 51 percent of prospective employees are willing to take a dip in salary range to work somewhere that will keep them engaged.

There’s more to the job than the salary

However, in addition to this separation from the numbers game that comes from discussing competitive salaries, it’s important to keep from resting on your laurels if the overall atmosphere of the company is a positive one. Why? Because there’s more to a job than these surface-level ideas, and prospective candidates like to know how they’ll relate to the company in the bigger picture.

For instance, the source highlighted the benefits of knowing what a staff member will be walking into before they arrive and how this recognition of the overall atmosphere will help people make decisions sooner rather than later. Is the position part of a new company, hoping to use the newcomer’s talents to continue flourishing? Or is the business seasoned enough to know when it’s ready to begin expanding?

Provide as much information as possible

Samantha Zupan, director of Glassdoor, told the source that knowing more about the company’s expectations of prospective candidates is often more of a draw than any of the aforementioned ideas. Additionally, sharing information about the kinds of work they’ll be doing will allow individuals an opportunity to see into their future if they decide to go with your offer. As a recruiter, it’s partially your responsibility to help people meet the needs of their vision, after all, and by helping people understand how this company stands out from the rest – for their needs, not the job’s – it may provide another reason to choose your company over another technical staffing company.

“They never know when that hot new startup is hiring that is in an area they feel passionate about, so they are always keeping their eyes and ears open,” Zupan told the source.

Keep things personal, not mechanical

A personal touch, as well, as opposed to an automated, robotic-sounding response from a recruiter will demonstrate the company’s seriousness in attracting candidates for who they are, rather than how they’ll positively affect the job. While this is the ultimate goal, it’s important to treat people like they’re valuable, worthwhile commodities, not pawns in the corporate chess game.

“It’s a turnoff when you get a generic email from a recruiter,” Zupan told the source. “It shows they’re not not paying attention to who that person is or why they might be a right fit.”

You should also keep in mind how new candidates will fit into the existing employee dynamic. Aside from their skill set and experience, what vibe will they bring? As these aren’t things you can derive from the modern resume, you’ll have to decide from the interview if you’re selling a company that just isn’t a good fit for someone’s personality. Most people, especially prospective candidates who are leaving behind their old careers to make a job switch, are looking for long-term placement, and if they arrive at a company only to discover that they’re not a good fit, it could be damaging for the reputation overall.

[class^="om-col-"]
[class^="om-col-"]
[class^="om-col-"]
[class^="om-col-"]
[gravityform id="8" title="false" description="false" ajax="true" tabindex="49"]